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Aunt and Nephew She Sued Over Lottery Win End Shocking Jackpot Feud

By on Friday, 21 September 2018
Woman Sues Nephew Over Jackpot Prize

A Canadian woman and the nephew she sued over a lottery win have finally come to an agreement over how they’ll split the money.

Barbara Reddick made headlines around the world after she decided to take her 19-year-old nephew to court last month over a lottery win from July.

The Nova Scotia pair won the grand prize od the “Chase the Ace” lottery and, because both she and her nephew’s name was on the winning ticket, the jackpot was going to be split 50/50. However, Reddick insisted that she only put her nephew’s name on the ticket for good luck and had never promised to split the jackpot.

It seems Reddick has changed her mind now as she has agreed to split the C$1.2 million prize (Around £690,000) with nephew Tyrone MacInnis during a settlement conference this week.

According to the BBC, Reddick, who originally bought the ticket, will receive the bulk of the winnings at C$872,639. MacInnis, meanwhile, will receive a small percentage of the win totalled at C$350,000.

In a statement to the BBC, Riddick’s lawyer said: “They are both satisfied with the terms of the settlement. It was reached mutually in order to avoid further court proceedings and to bring this matter to a final conclusion.”

A Broken Family

The feud between the pair began when they went to pick up their checks of C$611,319.50 in July. Then, Reddick claimed she had sent MacInnis to buy C$100 worth of tickets and told him to put his name on them for “good luck” but made it clear to MacInnis that she had no plans to split the jackpot should they win.

It was at the cheque presentation that she announced she was taken MacInnis to court. According to a statement, Reddick said she had “paid for everything for Tyrone” because she didn’t want him to “live like a student”.

The 57-year-old woman claimed she bought him a new PlayStation, a graduation suit, a car and game him C$100 a month in spending money.

Soon after, a Nova Scotia Supreme Court judge agreed to freeze MacInnis’ half of the jackpot and scheduled a settlement conference for the pair to come to an agreement.